Electrum Wallet Anleitung - Schnelle und einfache Bitcoin ...

Everyday info sec, hardcore info sec, and DNMs

Edit: Currently writing a new version of this, dont know when it will be done.
Edit: Since first post I have updated a few sections with additional information.
I recommend reading it all even if it is very long, I might have placed some relevant info in different sections while thinking about what else needed to be added, plenty of steps remains mostly the same except when I comment directly on it. It is not necessary to do 100% security all the time, unless you absolutely need it, combining some high and some lower security ideas for a balance of security and convenience is useful.
I will base this mostly on Windows, Linux users probably know this, and I have no idea how apple machines work (tho many things in here are still relevant for other operating systems, as they are just general tips)
Disclaimer: There are certainly other steps that can make you more anonymous or safer, however I think for most people this will surfice. Any software I recommend should be independently verified for security, and examples of software are not to be taken as endorsements. I simply use examples and give recommendations when I believe it necessary, or helpful.
I will not really differentiate between anonymity and security, they are often the same thing. As such the word security can mean either more anonymous, less vulnerable, or both.
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Everyday Simple Info Sec:
-There could be a hidden administrator user on your PC, make sure to change its password
(Snapchat msgs, reddit dms, discord msgs, are just a few examples of msgs that are never encrypted)
-Any info even send in encrypted msgs (and obviously non encrypted) should still be kept with possible deniability, don't say "I'm gonna do MDMA", say "I'm going out with molly."
-DO NOT STORE ANY PASSWORDS ON GOOGLE, IF GOOGLE LOGIN IS AUTHENTICATED IT WILL AUTFILL ALL PASSWORDS IT HAS SAVED (same with other similar services) (This means if you are logged in to chrome and someone has access to your machine, they can auto fill passwords without entering a single password)
-use a rememberable passphrase, especially for your master key ring aka password manager A long sentence that is memorable makes an okay password (decent example,: "I met my wife at Little Ceasers for the first time on 07/09/20" better even if it's just something you know, if its impersonal, and if you can add special characters or numbers that you won't forget) (A better example for a passphrase is: "There is 0nly 0ne letter that d0esn’t appear in any U.S. state nameQ")
-Purge your internet activity frequently, there's a reason why I only have one post, and a few comments appearing in my account, but thousands of kama. Exposing information needlessly is not good.
-Never post private information publicly, and if you do, do it vaguely as possible. (Example: Not "I'm 15", say "I'm a teenager") Do not post any vital information ever, no birthdays, mother's maiden name, age, or anything you have ever seen in a security question. Never post your current activities while they are ongoing. You going on a vacation? Don't announce it to the world, taking picture there? Post them when you are home.
-Rethink how you do security questions. Many answers to security questions can be found in your internet history. One could use the first word of the security question as an answer, or a different sceme that will mean you always remember it. (Security question need to go, the amount of personal info an average person puts on the internet makes it easy to attack anything using security question)
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High level crimimal information security:
The motto here is, "All the Security, All the Time" As one fuck up can end with you leaving a lick of traceability, and you could be fucked.
Pre Note: All of your software should always be up to date. Also even perfect info sec does not guarantee you are completely safe, a new zero day (exploit) can still fuck you, but good info security makes you significantly safer, by eliminating as many attacks as possible.
-Get a new device (or make a already owned device seem like you never owned it, do this only if you know how to, there's a lot of stuff that goes into that, like changing your mac adress etc) buy with cash, and your face covered, preferably far away from where you live. (Do I need to specify to not bring your phone or anything else that tracks your location to anywhere you want to go anonymously?) (Be aware that even hardware can have vulnerabilities, many cpus have known vulnerabilities, I can't list them all, do some research before buying)
-If you know how to use Tails (A linux distro designed for Info sec) use that, preferably on a USB. (Or learn how to use tails, its better, but complicated) Otherwise a clean copy of windows (make sure its not in any way associated with you) can do the job too, tho not as well. (Using a VM might give extra security, since VMs usually erase all data and RAM they were using on shutdown)
-Get a non tracking VPN, Enable the kill switch (a setting that disables all traffic that doesn't go through the VPN) (change your firewall settings to only allow the traffic from the VPN, windows guide (Change settings so only traffic from the tor application is send) Edit: (Due to complaints: do not use vpn over tor, use tor over vpn. tor over vpn has no notable downside, if the VPN logs it makes no difference, your ISP will always log anyways, and vpns remove other attack vectors and also provide backup security should tor fail. Again even if the VPN tracks you only change the people doing the tracking, but now you are further removed making it more anonymous and also with less vulnerabilities)
-rember privacy settings, cookie cleaner, and antivirus, password (There could be a hidden administrator user on your PC, make sure to change its password)
-Always use the device on a non admin account
-Ideally use this device only on networks that are not connected with you. Such as public networks (try to never use the same public networks twice, move around) (a home network should be fine now, as it should never be exposed, but more security is always better) (Its just a conveniences vs security trade)
-Never use accounts that have been exposed to lower security on higher security machines
-your browser is now TOR (or your preferred security focused browser, if you dont plan on using onion ) Make sure you get the standalone version of tor not the addon build (the standalone is safer, because there are less settings and options to tweak)
-Change your tor settings, to safest mode, enable a bridge (to my knowledge there's no difference in security between the build in bridges in tor), enable automatic updates, set duckduckgo onion as your primary browser. Set dark.fail onion page as your home page. (Or your preferred privacy search engine and onion directory)
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How to use dark net markets (DNMs)
If you finished your High Security setup, we can dive right in. Otherwise go do that. This is where all that is essential.
Quick info on Tor, and onion sites. There is no search engine. It's all based of directories and addresses you are given by others. Tor will likely not be very quick, it has to pass through multiple networks to get to the destination. DNMs sometimes exit scam, an exit scam is when a market shuts down completely and takes all the money, this is a risk when using DNMs, it's not too common but happens maybe 0-4 times a year. The admins of thoese servers need to get out at some point, before they get jailed, so they exit the game, and scam everyone out of their money.
-A very useful onion directory is dark.fail it has a lot of links, for all kinds of stuff. News, email, DNMs, Psychonautwiki (harm reduction website), forums etc. (Other directories also exist)
-Pick a market, preferably one that handles secure connection server side instead of requiring you to establish the secure connection. Then create an account. Your account once created should include an entry box in your profile for a pgp key, post your PUBLIC key in there. (Verify the link is not a scam, most markets should provide a pgp signature)
-Next is currency setup. All major cryptocurrency exchangers can be used, I can recommend coin base but there could be better ones out there. Unless you find a small non U.S., exchange, they will always ask for your identity. So unless you can find a trustworthy exchange that doesn't ID, you will need to give it to them. (Side note, all major crypto exchangers report to the IRS, if the IRS asks you if you bought cryptocurrency and you bought while having IDed yourself SAY YES, DO NOT COMMIT TAX FRAUD WHEN THEY KNOW YOU DID)
-Transfer (monero you can send directly, btc you should scramble) to your wallet. There are two options a cold wallet (physical) or a software wallet. Software wallets usually dont cost anything so I recommend them, even if often less safe. Electrum is easy to use, and pretty safe. You can also do your own research and find a wallet that fits your needs.
-now you are ready to buy, only buy using escrow (it means the money is held by the market as a middle man until the product is delivered, they will also handle any issues like wrong quantity, cuts, etc), judge the reviews for a product, and if available look at the history of the vendor, until you find a product from a vendor you trust. (I recommend to buy within your country as much as possible, so it doesn't go through customs, it's very rare that something is found, but it can happen)
-now you get to buy, depending on market, you either have cryptocurrency stored in their wallets (not recommend, you will lose it in an exit scam) or you can send it every order. When you send your delivery adress (or the one you want it to go to) encrypt the adress using the sellers public key. Make sure the adress is correct.
-wait for the product, make sure to extend the escrow until the product arrives, if you can't extend it anymore dispute the order, and a moderator will step in
-test the product, use it, and leave a review. PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW, DNMs only work because of reviews.
Edit: Didn't imagine I would write over 15000 words. Oh well, it was fun. Hope it helps, if you have any questions feel free to ask.
No idea how long this will stay up, I might purge it in 7 days, or never.
submitted by seven_N_A7 to u/seven_N_A7 [link] [comments]

Storing your coins safely while not risking loss of keys

This was originally an answer to a question that was asked here, but OP deleted their post.
This might help some newbies (especially the multisig edit at the end), so I want to make sure it's still accessible here.
The original question was whether the Electrum wallet stores a Trezor's private key when using a passphrase.
OP noticed that their Trezor wouldn't connect to their Electrum wallet when entering a different passphrase than they used when creating the wallet. Thus, OP (likely) assumed that the wallet stored the private key, as it somehow knew that a different private key was now used.
Here is my original answer (with some modifications):
IMPORTANT: I'm assuming here that you connected your Trezor by choosing the "hardware wallet" option in Electrum, rather than giving Electrum your 12/24 seed words.
TL;DR: No, your coins are safe :)
I'm assuming by passphrase) you mean the 25th (or 13th) word. When you have this feature enabled, a private key gets generated every time you enter a passphrase. When you enter the same passphrase you used to create the wallet, the wallet with your funds shows up.
Whenever you enter something different, a different private key is generated on your Trezor. This allows you to have multiple different wallets, for example by choosing the passphrases "First Wallet", "Second Wallet", "Third Wallet", or a secret wallet with a secret passphrase.
So whenever you enter a new passphrase when connecting your Trezor to Electrum, the Trezor will send a new public key to Electrum. Electrum will then derive addresses from this public key and check those for balances. It won't find any, as you used a new passphrase.
EDIT: I just realized that you said your wallet doesn't connect to Electrum when you use a different passphrase. This is simply because Electrum doesn't receive the correct public key from the Trezor and therefore Electrum thinks it's a different wallet (which it is).
When you enter the passphrase you used during creation of your wallet, the Trezor will send your actual public key to Electrum, which will then find addresses with balances, which it will show to you. EDIT (to clarify): Connecting your Trezor after creating the wallet is only necessary to send funds or verify addresses, as the public key is already stored in the wallet.dat.
The only thing Electrum actually stores is the public key, which can only be used to look at your Bitcoin, not to move them. You might want to keep this public key a secret as well though, since it links all your funds to you. This is what Electrum stores in the wallet.dat file, which you can just encrypt by choosing a password for it.
Well done using a passphrase by the way! Should someone get their hands on your Trezor, a sophisticated attacker can get the secret key off the device in 15 minutes. Using a passphrase makes this attack almost useless, as the both secret key AND the passphrase are needed to move your funds, and the passphrase is not stored on the device. A passphrase also allows you to hide funds from potential robbers that force you to unlock your wallet.
You can do this by activating the passphrase feature and sending your funds to a wallet with a secret passphrase (do NOT lose this, as losing your passphrase renders your funds inaccessible). Afterwards, you can safely deactivate the passphrase feature, so the device doesn't even ask for one should you get robbed. Simply reactivate it when you need to access your funds.
EDIT: Should you be worried that you might forget your passphrase, you should look into multisig wallets. Depending on how you set this up, you can make it more secure against theft and less likely for you to lose access to your funds.
Say for example you get four wallets: two hardware wallets, a well-protected (airgapped) laptop with Electrum, and a secure mobile wallet that allows for multisig (like Fully Noded).
You can then create a 2-of-4 multisig wallet that requires you to sign transactions with any two of these four wallets.
The increase in security comes from the fact that an attacker now needs full access to two of your devices (or their stored private keys) at once.
At the same time, the fact that you yourself now also need access to only half of your devices means that in the event of a total loss of one (or even two) of them, you can still move your funds to a new wallet.
As long as you do regular checks (e.g. first day of each month), ensuring that you still have access to all your devices' stored private keys, you can always catch a loss of keys and fix this without losing funds (by creating a new multisig wallet and sending the funds there).
This allows you to use a passphrase on your wallets without storing it anywhere physically or digitally. This would usually be very risky, as forgetting the passphrase would lead to a loss of funds, but this risk is now close to eliminated.
(The following part was not in the original answer)
Some IMPORTANT general secruity tips:
  1. Consider including trusted friends and/or family members as co-signers for a multisig wallet. This ensures that it's not even possible for you alone to hand over funds to an attacker. Depending on your level of trust, you might want to make sure that your co-signers can't collaborate to steal your funds (if you include 3 people, create at least a 4-of-n multisig). You could also deliberately make it possible for all or even just some of your co-signers to move your funds (3 co-signers, 3(or less)-of-n multisig) to make sure your funds aren't lost should pass away unexpectedly.
  2. Consider running your own full node and Electrum server (also check the alternatives), which you connect your Electrum wallet to. This ensures that you don't send your public key to anyone else. If someone knows your public key, they know how much BTC you own, making you a potential target.
  3. Always encrypt your wallet.dat (or whatever you called your wallet file), even if it's a watch-only wallet. This protects your public key (see 1. for why you want that).
  4. Create watch-only wallets: Use an airgapped) device to create a wallet with Electrum (make sure to back up the seed phrase) and export the public key. Then create a new watch-only wallet on another device (like your everyday laptop) with that public key to be able to check your funds. To create the initial wallet, you can also use any other hard- or software wallet that allows you to export the master public key.
  5. Hide, or (when using a hardware wallet with a passphrase) even delete your watch-only wallets. Hiding your funds makes you less of a target. When using a hardware wallet, recreating the watch-only wallet is fast and simple, so you don't need to store it if you don't want to check your funds every day. Note that this approach doesn't help much when you don't use a passphrase, as an attacker will obviously check the passphrase-less wallet no matter what.
  6. Keep some funds on your hardware wallet(s). If an attackers sees funds on the wallet(s), they might not force you to enter a passphrase or ask if you have any multisig wallets (lying under pressure is hard).
  7. Hide all your wallets in different places. If someone sees that you have multiple wallets lying around, they might realize you have a multisig wallet.
  8. Don't risk a robber getting (for example) two keys to your 2-of-4 multisig wallet and then racing them to move your funds with the other two keys when they leave. They're gonna come back and be pissed. If it comes to this, you need protection until the robber is caught. STAY SAFE!
  9. The easiest way to solve a problem is to never have it. Don't make yourself a target. If nobody even suspects that you have a multisig (or any wallet at all), they're probably not gonna look for it.
Please correct any mistakes you find and I will edit my post. I will also gladly add more tips to the list. I will of course credit anyone who helps.
Tip for devs who want something cool and important to work on: Make the creation and usage of multisig wallets as noob-friendly as possible. If someone expresses worries about losing access to their funds by forgetting the seed phrase, wallet pin, etc. (someone in my family actually brought this up to me), multisig wallets are the perfect solution as they add redundancy.
submitted by Fittiboy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I remember plans for C-Lightning to be integrated in bitcoin-core - is there someone working on it?

I realize that Lightning has some development that needs to be done for it to truly meet its expectations, but I think it has to be a part of the core client. Otherwise, I'm not surprised that it's not more widely used. It's going to be 3 years from Segwit this summer. I think that the ATH we had in 2017 partly could be attributed to the expectations Lightning rouse. And it's more than anything that could bring us to new highs. But, it has to be officially recognized, to have a proper GUI, etc... Other thing I could think of is both parties to be able to commit bitcoins on chain when openning a channel. Otherwise, I wonder why it's not already in bitcoin-core? Wonders do not exist, but improvements matter, and Lightning is an improvement, even in its current state, and Lightning itself could be improved relatively freely.
submitted by zahyur to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Using lightning with own node

I have an bitcoin core + electrum server + LND node setup. Which android mobile app would be the best for connecting to my own lightning node? (Goal being for the most control/trustless).
Some to compare would be Blue wallet, BLW, Breez, Phoenix, Zap, LightningLabs, Wallet of Satoshi and Eclair.
Also what is the difference, to using "remote control" setup with something like Blue wallets LNDHub software, or setting up macaroons to connect to my node.
Compared to doing it without, and just opening a single channel to my own node that is well-connected to the network? Shouldn't all transactions be able to route through my channel between my mobile and node? So there is no point to using remote control node software?
Say my node has $1000 of channel liquidity, and I open a $200 channel from my mobile to my wallet. Shouldn't the mobile wallet be able to route my transaction via my node to anywhere? And then I can push the $200 back to my wallet from the node later when its running low?
submitted by brando2131 to lightningnetwork [link] [comments]

ElectrumX vs EPS and security of the server

Hi team, can you please explain two things:
1) I have read there is also an implementation called ElectrumX. But I only found a guide how to installl EPS by Chris Belcher on github. Can you linke me to a nice guide for ElectrumX? What are the main differences between ElectrumX vs EPS ?
2) What security related tradeoffs are you making when using EPS for your full node? EPS is a server, so are not servers able to "spy" on server activities and see everything in an un-encrypted manner?
3) When you run your own EPS how can you make sure that it works also in years? From what is its functionality depending? Is it some sort decentralized mash network? I like to know which scenario must take place in order for the EPS server infrastructure not to work anymore? the Worst case
Thanks all
submitted by celentano1234 to Electrum [link] [comments]

What I currently use for privacy

So this is what software I currently use for privacy, would like some opinions if possible:
Starting with my cellphone, my device is a Google Pixel 3A XL with GrapheneOS flashed, I have the following apps installed:
F-Droid and AuroraOSS (as my app stores), NewPipe (youtube client), Vanadium (web browser), Tutanota and K-9 Mail (for e-mails), OsmAnd+ (for maps), Joplin (notes), Open Camera (camera), OpenBoard and Mozc for Android (Keyboard and Japanese Keyboard), Aegis Authenticator, KeePassDX (password manager), LibreTorrent (torrent client), Librera PRO (pdf/epub/mobi reader, I don't own a Kindle nor want to own one so I use my cellphone to read), Tachiyomi (manga reader), Signal (for messaging), Vinyl Music Player, VLC, Simple Gallery Pro and Simple Calendar Pro (I prefer them over stock Graphene options) and I also use Electrum and Samourai (Bitcoin Wallet) and Monerujo (Monero Wallet)
I also have OpenVPN (for VPN) and use a private DNS for ad and tracking blocking (provided by my VPN provider)
I have 3-4 PCs, will go over every single one of them:
my main PC is a desktop PC (that I built myself) that I mainly use for working and other tasks.
It runs Artix Linux (basically Arch Linux without systemd), I use UFW as my firewall (denying all incoming and also denying all outgoing only allowing what is useful) and I also use AppArmor Profiles, I disabled IPV6 and SWAP, configured my VPN connection as well on network settings and I currently run OpenVPN on my computer (my VPN provider allows for multi-hop cascade through OpenVPN in which I can create a custom VPN cascade up to four servers, each consecutive hop re-encrypts my traffic and assigns me a new IP address) and I've also set disk encryption on installation (have set in all of my computers)
As for software: I use Mozilla Firefox as my web browser (I set it to always be in private mode, unchecked suggestions for browsing history, bookmarks, and open tabs, I've also disabled the Firefox data collection in settings and block dangerous and deceptive content, I use DuckDuckGo as my search engine, I use Firefox Home as my default as my homepage. The rest of my tweaks were done in about:config (using privacytools.io site tweaks + geo.enabled = false, network.cookie.lifetimePolicy = 2 and dom.security.https_only_mode as true which are not listed on the site) and the only addons I use are uBlock Origin on Hard Mode and Decentraleyes), KeePassXC (password manager), VIM (use it as a Text Editor and as an IDE for coding), LibreOffice (for working stuff), GIMP (image editor), VLC, qBitTorrent and Tutanota's Desktop Client and Thunderbird (for e-mails)
I also use KVM/QEMU for virtual machines (usually in case I wanna test some distro or use Tails/Whonix)
For my gaming PC (also a desktop I've built myself) I run Manjaro KDE on it, the only apps I have in the system are Firefox (same settings as above), OBS and KVM/QEMU (which I use a Win10 virtual machine for games, there are tutorials on YouTube on how to do so if you're interested). I have the same firewall settings as above, using AppArmor as well and I've also disabled IPV6 and SWAP, I run OpenVPN on it as well as my VPN DNS settings on network settings. I also use different mouse and keyboard on both my PCs and never mix them together.
My other 2 PCs are both laptops, one is a Acer Aspire Nitro I've bought for work (in case I need to work while in a trip or if I wanna work outside etc), it has the same settings and programs as my main PC but I run Gentoo on it. The other laptop is an old ThinkPad that runs Slackware on it, but I rarely use it and this laptop is most of the times not with me for safety reasons.
For some other devices and stuff: I have an Asus RT-AC86U router with OpenWRT flashed on it that I also run OpenVPN config files (this one coming from another provider, I use two VPN providers, on in my PCs and the other in my router), I have a Ledger Nano S as a hardware wallet for both Bitcoin and Monero (most of my cryptocurrency is there, I use hardware wallet for hodling purposes and as my emergency funding) and I have LOTS of USB flash drivers (all of them for Linux Live ISOs purposes), I also have a Nintendo Switch Lite (only gaming console I have, although have not been playing that much on it recently) that I only connect to the internet in case I need to download some updates or play online and after I'm done I immediately disconnect it from the internet.
Some other privacy habits I have are:
I don't own any smart device like Smart TVs (I've been more than 10 years now without watching TV, doesn't even bother me), Smart Fridges or Dishwashers that connect to your internet, ROOMBAS, Smart Home etc, I keep all my money on crypto (and I have a small amount in gold as well, but I rarely invest on it, all my gold is stored in a manual safe here in my apartment) and I only have like, 10 bucks or so in my back account (as soon as I receive any money I just left the necessary in my account to pay bills and put all the rest on crypto, I try to pay everything on crypto or cash), I RARELY use cloud storage, but if I need to, I go with NextCloud and encrypt all my files with VeraCrypt before uploading it, all my VPN services were paid with Bitcoin (I try to pay everything with crypto as previously said) and I never write directly into any website, I usually write my text on a text editor, copy it and paste it on the website (needless to say that I don't use mainstream social media as well)
So, what do you guys think? anything that you would add your recommend me? (before anyone mentions about self-hosting a DNS server using Pi-hole on a Raspberry Pi, I'm actually thinking on doing it in a near future)
EDIT: forgot to mention that I don't watch YouTube on PC on youtube site, I mostly watch youtube's videos on invidio.us and only use the youtube site for watching live streams honestly. And I also barely go outside with my smartphone (only if I really need to) and I usually keep it away from my computers etc.
EDIT 2: also another thing: I covered all my laptop's webcams with black electrical tape, I have a Logitech C922 Pro webcam for my desktop PCs but rarely use it, and when I need to use it, I unplug it as soon as I'm done with it.
submitted by SlackAcademic to privacytoolsIO [link] [comments]

Electrum servers

Hi everyone! I'm currently researching what bitcoin wallet to use. Electrum seems to be my choice. But here is one concern: many places online and YouTube videos tells that most electrum servers is run by chain analasys companies. Is there a way to somehow find out to whom I'm connecting? Or is there a kind of sorting/filtering system in electrum software that favor decentralization and doing that for me?
submitted by m416415 to Electrum [link] [comments]

How to Store Your Bitcoin

Before holding any bitcoin, you need somewhere to store it. Just like in the physical world, you store your bitcoin in a wallet.
Similar to a bank account number, your wallet comes with a wallet address that shows up in a ledger search and is shared with others so you can make transactions. This address, which is a shorter, more usable version of your public key, consists of between 26 and 35 random alphanumeric characters, something like 1A1zP1eP5QGefi2DMPTfTL5SLmv7DivfNa. Keep in mind that every letter and number in that address is important. Before sending any bitcoin to your wallet, double-check the entire address, character by character.
Also tied to your wallet address is one or more private keys, which as the name suggests should not be shared with anyone. Keys are used to verify you own the aforementioned public key, and to sign off on transactions. Some wallets create a secure seed phrase, a set of words that will allow you to unlock your wallet if you lose your keys. Print this phrase out and keep it in a safe place.
The unfortunate truth is your bitcoin wallet is akin to your physical wallet. If you lose the private keys to your wallet, you’re most likely going to lose the currency in it forever.
Your wallet generates a master file where your public and private keys are stored. This file should be backed up in case the original file is lost or damaged. Otherwise, you risk losing access to your funds.
You can store your private keys on your computer, mobile device, on a physical storage gadget or even on a piece of paper. It’s crucial that you keep your private keys safe by generating backups both online and offline.
Remember: Your wallet does not reside on any single device. The wallet itself resides on the Bitcoin blockchain, just as your banking app doesn’t truly “hold” the cash in your checking account.
While wallet apps work well and are relatively safe, the safest option is a hardware wallet you keep offline, in a secure place. The most popular hardware wallets use special layers of security to ensure your keys are not stolen and your bitcoin is safe. But, once again, if you lose the hardware wallet your bitcoins are gone unless you have kept reliable backups of the keys.
The least-secure option is an online wallet, i.e. storing your bitcoin in an exchange. This is because the keys are held by a third party. For many, the online exchange wallets are the easiest to set up and use, presenting an all-too-familiar choice: convenience versus safety.
Many serious bitcoin investors use a hybrid approach: They hold a core, long-term amount of bitcoin offline in so-called “cold storage,” while keeping a spending balance in a mobile account.
Depending on your bitcoin strategy and willingness to get technical, here are the different types of bitcoin wallets available. Bitcoin.org has a helper that will show you which wallet to choose.
Cloud wallets exist online and the keys are usually stored in a distant server run by a third party. Cloud-based wallets tend to have a more user-friendly interface but you will be trusting a third party with your private keys, which makes your funds more susceptible to theft. Some examples of this wallet type are Coinbase, Blockchain and Lumi Wallet. Most cryptocurrencies, including bitcoin, have their own native wallets. Some offer additional security features such as offline storage (Coinbase and Xapo).
With your private keys stored on a server, you have to trust the host’s security measures and also trust the host won’t disappear with your money or close down and deny you access.
Software wallets can be installed directly on your computer, giving you private control of your keys. Most have relatively easy configuration and are free. The disadvantage is you are in charge of securing your keys. Software wallets also require greater security precautions. If your computer is hacked or stolen, the thief can get a copy of your wallet and your bitcoin.
While you can download the original software Bitcoin Core protocol (which stores a ledger of all transactions since 2009 and takes up a lot of space), most wallets in use today are “light” wallets, or SPV (Simplified Payment Verification) wallets, which do not download the entire ledger but sync to it.
Electrum is a well-known SPV desktop bitcoin wallet that also offers “cold storage” (a totally offline option for additional security). Exodus can track multiple assets with a sophisticated user interface. Some (such as Jaxx Liberty) can hold a wide range of digital assets, and some (such as Copay) offer the possibility of shared accounts.
Before downloading any app, please confirm you are downloading a legitimate copy of a real wallet. Some shady programmers create clones of various crypto websites and offer downloads for free, leading to the possibility of a hack.
Mobile wallets are available as apps for your smartphone, especially useful if you want to pay for something in bitcoin in a shop or if you want to buy, sell or send while on the move. All of the online wallets and most of the desktop ones mentioned above have mobile versions, while others – such as Abra, Edge and Bread – were created with mobile in mind. Remember, many online wallets will store your keys on the phone itself, leading to the possibility of losing your bitcoin if you lose your phone. Always keep a backup of your keys on a different device and print out your seed phrase.
Hardware wallets are small devices that connect to the web only to enact bitcoin transactions. They are more secure because they are generally offline and therefore not hackable. They can be stolen or lost, however, along with the bitcoins that belong to the stored private keys, so it’s recommended that you backup your keys. Some large investors keep their hardware wallets in secure locations such as bank vaults. Trezor, Keepkey and Ledger are notable examples.
Paper wallets are perhaps the simplest of all the wallets. Paper wallets are pieces of paper that contain the private and public keys of a bitcoin address. Ideal for the long-term storage of bitcoin (away from fire and water, of course) or for the giving of bitcoin as a gift, these wallets are more secure in that they’re not connected to a network. They are, however, easier to lose.
With services such as WalletGenerator, you can easily create a new address and print the wallet on your printer. When you’re ready to top up your paper wallet you simply send some bitcoin to that address and then store it safely. Whatever option you go for, be sure to back up everything and only tell your nearest and dearest where your backups are stored.
submitted by hackatoshi to u/hackatoshi [link] [comments]

Nano S & X with Electrum

I came across a never before seen set of screens on Nano S & X trying to spend a particular UTXO using Electrum Desktop (an individual in the Coins tab).
I get the following message on the Ledger screen.
  1. Unverified inputs
  2. Update Ledger Live
  3. or 3rd party wallet software.
Testing was both on my own node and Electrum's servers.
The code is current: electrum 3.3.8, and Ledger bitcoin app v1.4.2.
Could this recent ledger bitcoin app (the only change in the mix) not be playing well with electrum?
submitted by PeteDaKat to ledgerwallet [link] [comments]

FAQ for Beginners

What is Bitcoin?

Bitcoin is scarce, decentralized, and global digital money that cannot be censored.

Quick Advice

  • Do not respond to strangers messaging you with investment advice or offers and read how to avoid being scammed from the posts below.
  • Do not invest in Bitcoin until you do basic research, paid off all high interest debt, and have a emergency savings account of a stable fiat currency.
  • If investing do not expect to get rich quickly. You should expect to wait at least 1-2 years before taking profits. Bitcoin is currently very volatile. In the interim spend and replace Bitcoin because its a useful currency.
  • Beginners should avoid all mining and day trading until at least very familiar with Bitcoin. Mining is very professional(You cannot efficiently mine with your computer and need to buy special ASIC machines) and most people lose money day trading.
  • Never store your Bitcoins on an exchange or web wallet. Buy your bitcoins and withdraw it to your personal wallet where you actually own them instead of IOUs. Services like Robinhood and Revoult should be avoided because you cannot withdraw or use Bitcoin.
  • Make sure you make a backup of your wallet(software holding keys to your BTC) and preferably keep it offline and physical and private. Typically 12 to 24 words you write down on paper or metal. This onetime backup will restore all your keys, addresses , and Bitcoins on a new wallet if you lose your old wallet.
  • Beginners should avoid altcoins, tokens, and ICOs at least initially until they learn about Bitcoin. Most of these are scams and you should be familiar with the basics first. Bitcoin is referred to as BTC or XBT.

Exchanges Requiring ID Verification

Bitcoin = BTC or XBT on exchanges
Exchange Buy fee* Withdraw BTC Notes
Cash App Sliding ~2.2% to 1% 0 BTC Instant Withdraw, USA only
Coinbase Debit3.99% ACH1.49% 1-4USD ~7Day hold BTC withdraw
CoinbasePro 0.5% 1-4USD ~7Day hold free ACH Deposit or €0.15 EUR SEPA fee
Gemini 1.49% to 0.25%ATrader 0 BTC 10 free BTC withdraws w/ActiveTrader
Kraken 0.16% 0.0005 BTC Deposit Fiat=USwire+5USD or SEPA free
Bitstamp 0.50% 0.0005 BTC Deposit Fiat=0 SEPA or 5% card fee
Note: Exchanges all have unique market prices and spreads so fees alone will not tell you the best rates. Best way is to directly compare the rates between exchanges. Buy fees above are for normal trading volumes. Verification and hold times can vary based upon lack of history, verification level or credit.
More exchanges per location
For a secure Decentralized Exchange (DEX) use https://bisq.network

Recommended Wallets

Best wallets for securing small amounts of BTC
electrum For Desktop and Android
Pros= Great Desktop and Android wallet with advanced functionality like coin control
Cons= UX is not as polished as some other wallets, make sure you only upgrade from official sources like play store or https://electrum.org as malicious servers or adverts can tell you to upgrade malware from other sites
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4EhZg5QslI
Phoenix LN wallets for Android
Pros- Lightning network integration(as well as onchain) allowing you to spend with LN merchants for instant confirmations and much lower fees. Easiest lightning wallet to use
Cons- Lightning is still somewhat experimental and less merchants accept it.
https://phoenix.acinq.co/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx5PK1H5OR0
Breez LN wallet for Android and IOS
https://breez.technology
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_4b-y4T8bY
Pros- Lightning network integration(as well as onchain) allowing you to spend with LN merchants for instant confirmations and much lower fees
Cons- Lightning is still somewhat experimental and less merchants accept it.
Other Lightning wallets - http://lightningnetworkstores.com/wallets
Blockstream Green Wallet IOS and android wallet
Pros- Great UX, easy hardware wallet and full node integration, RBF, HW wallet support and advanced 2fa options Cons- Until single signature is released 2 of 2 multisig means that one must depend upon blockstream’s server for tx signing. Other light wallets are dependent upon other servers as well but light wallets like electrum allow you to swap servers.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uO3Zi9D5b0Y
https://blockstream.com/green/
Securing Larger amounts of Bitcoin
ledger nano S wallet = ~68 USD https://shop.ledger.com/products/ledger-nano-s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YI1OntWB7wc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGe2GgfkO64
trezor one wallet = ~54 USD https://shop.trezor.io
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pT1j_kbZBEo
Trezor Model T = ~164 USD https://shop.trezor.io
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3BIo5Ac_n4
Cold Card Hardware wallet = 119.97 USD https://store.coinkite.com/store/coldcard
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kocEpndQcsg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8dBNrlwJ0k
Digital Bitbox 02 = 109 USD https://shiftcrypto.ch/bitbox02/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdP_7LgZw7s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7nRq2OEhiw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6D4FgJo3j64
Best Advanced Bitcoin Wallet= Bitcoin Core
Pros= Great privacy and security
Cons= UX is for more experienced users, takes ~week to sync and requires ~5GB minimum disk space if prunned
https://bitcoincore.org/en/download/
Best High Privacy Bitcoin Wallet = Wasabi
Pros= Best Privacy with Chaumian CoinJoin built in
Cons= mixing coins costs more fees and for more advanced users
https://www.wasabiwallet.io/#download
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECQHAzSckK0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPKpC9cRcZo&list=PLmoQ11MXEmahCG1nkbKK6DiAwVx9giJCi
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8wQK-Ndl3Q&list=PLPj3KCksGbSaEmjU0sywoTYDVYYSu8LsS

Further Resources

https://www.lopp.net/bitcoin-information.html
https://www.lopp.net/lightning-information.html
https://10hoursofbitcoin.com/
http://bitcoinrabbithole.org/
https://bitcoin-resources.com
https://www.bitcoin101.club
https://21lessons.com
submitted by bitusher to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

cant send bitcoin 2 issue

good afternoon,
I have been trying to send some of my bitcoin throw Electrum software wallet,
first, I used to have this message (( The server returned an error when broadcasting the transaction. Consider trying to connect to a different server, or updating Electrum. Transaction could not be broadcast due to dust outputs.)))
i went online and start reading about it I found out that I could resolve this issue by changing the network from my wallet which is I did which it did stop coming for me then now I start getting a different message which it says
(( BestEffortRequestFailed('no interface to do request on... gave up.',))
so here am this is my spending the whole day just trying to send some bitcoin, I have been reading here about this problem but don't seem to find a satisfying answer !!
i hope you can help out
thank you
submitted by bigenough333 to Electrum [link] [comments]

All my BTC stolen from Electrum Wallet

Today I opened my electrum wallet where i had my BTC and tryed to send 1BTC to coinbase.
When I clicked send, it came up a pop up saying that I must update wallet software version.
Since I did not had open my wallet at least 6 months ago, I thought that was normal to exist some new software version, so I clicked to perform wallet update.
Then I realised that I was stolen, since all my BTC gone to a unknown address.
What Can I do now?
I was not aware of this phishing issue on electrum wallets... Everything seems trustable...
Please is there any thing I can do?? All my BTC gone and desperate!
4.99898885 BTC
submitted by massires to Electrum [link] [comments]

Electrum hack attempt?

Recently restored a wallet from seed onto a new laptop.
Went through gpg4win to verify certificate/signature/public key from electrum.
During and immediately after restore process, antivirus flagged up various 'intrusion attempts' which look to have been blocked.
New laptop, almost zero software downloaded, any ideas on what happened?
I disconnected wifi, not yet connected again, any suggestions as to best route forward? Uninstall electrum and start all over again?
Any advice much appreciated.
submitted by btcforthewin to Electrum [link] [comments]

06-20 06:24 - 'Are you on GitHub? If so, be sure to show some love to the best Bitcoin projects around!' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/RiccardoMasutti removed from /r/Bitcoin within 1139-1149min

'''
Most of us use Bitcoin software for free. Very often, however, we forget that behind these software there is the work of thousands of people.
If you are on GitHub, spend 5 minutes of your time to show appreciation for their work and "star" repositories. If you are not registered yet, you may think of doing so! Who knows, maybe in the future you could become a contributor to those same projects!
[link]26
Here you will find a list (alphabetically ordered) which lists some of the most important projects in this community:
Bisq: [[link]27
Bitcoin: [[link]28
Bitcoin Knots: [[link]29
Bluewallet: [[link]30
Btcd: [[link]31
BTCPay Server: [[link]32
BTC RPC Explorer: [[link]33
C-lightning: [[link]34
Eclair: [[link]35
Electrum: [[link]36
ElectrumX: [[link]37
Electrum Personal Server: [[link]38
Electrum Server: [[link]39
JoinMarket: [[link]40
LND: [[link]41
LN Zap: [[link]42
Mastering Bitcoin Book: [[link]43
Mycelium: [[link]44
OpenBazaar: [[link]45
Raspiblitz: [[link]46
Raspibolt: [[link]47
Ride The Lightning: [[link]48
Samourai Wallet: [[link]49
Wasabi Wallet: [[link]50
Zeus LN: [[link]51

The list is obviously incomplete, given the huge number of projects. Feel free to share the link of the projects that I have not mentioned.
'''
Are you on GitHub? If so, be sure to show some love to the best Bitcoin projects around!
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: RiccardoMasutti
1: gi*h*b*com/bisq-netw*r**bi*q 2: githu*.com*bit*oin*bi**oin 3: *it**b.co**bitco**knots*bitcoin 4: git*ub.co**BlueWa*let/Bl***a*let 5: githu*.co***tcsuite*b*cd 6: *ithub**om*btcpayser*e*/btcp*ys**ver 7: *it*ub.c*m/ja*oside/*tc-*pc*exp*o*er 8: g***ub.com/**emen*s*roject/l**htning 9: gi*h*b.c*m/ACI*Q*eclai* 10: *it*ub.**m/spe**ilo/elect*um 11: g*t*u***om/k*uupich*n/electrum* 12: *ithub.*om*ch*i*-belchee**ctrum*pers*nal-*e*v*r 13: g*th*b.c*m/**es*ilo/elec*rum-s*r*er 14: gith*b.*om/***nMarke**Org/joinmar**t*clie*ts*rver 15: gi**u**c*m**ightningnetwork/l*d 16: github**om/L*-*ap/**p-deskto* 17: gi*hub**om/bitc**nbook*bi*coinboo* 18: **thub.com/my*e*ium*c*m/ 19: g**hub.*om*Ope*Ba*aar*ope*ba*aar-des*top 20: *ithu**c*m/r*otzol**raspi*litz 21: g*thu*.co*/Stadicu*/*a*p*Bolt 22: g*t*ub*c*m/Ride-The-L*gh*ni*g*RTL 23: gith*b.com/*a**urai-W*llet*s*mour*i-walle**and*o*d 24: gith*b.com/**S*A*Ks/W*lle*Was*bi 25: gi*h*b.co*/Zeu*LN*zeu* 26: preview.*e*d.*t/mlpx*o8*ou55**j*g?w**th=1*50&am*;fo**at*pjpg**m*;auto**e**&*=3*891**c7*0b1293163a6255345a*bca*2e8*e9d 27: g***ub.com/*isq-n*twork/b**q]^*1 28: git*u**com**itcoi*/*itcoin*^^2 29: *it*ub.com/bi****nknots/bi*co**]^^3 30: gi*hub.co*/BlueWall***Blu*Wa*l*t]^^* 31: git*ub.com*b*csuite/b**d]^** 32: *i*hu*.co**btc*ayserver*btcpayserv***^^6 33: *ith*b.com/jan*si*e*btc-*p*-exp*orer]^** 34: git**b.c**/Ele*ent*Proje***li*htning]^^8 35: *ith*b.com/*CINQ/e*l**r]^*9 36: github.*om/s*es*ilo/*le*trum**^1* 37: g**hub.*om/kyuup*chan*elect*um**^*11 38: *ithub.com/***is-b*lche*/***c*rum-**rsonal-s*rver*^^12 39: gi**ub.c***s*esmilo/el*c*r*m-*erver]^^13 40: github.com/J*in*ar***-O*g/***nma*k**-clients*rver]^*14 41: *it**b.*om/*ig***ingnetw*rk/lnd]^^15 42: github.*om/LN-**p/*a*-de*kto*]^^1* 43: *ithu***om/bitc*i*book/*itcoi**ook]*^17 44: gi*hu*.co*/my*e*i*m-com/]^*18 45: gith**.co**Op**Bazaa**o*en*azaar-desktop*^^19 46: gi*h*b.*om*r*otzoll/rasp*b*it*]*^20 47: g*th**.com/Stadicus/Rasp**o*t*^*21 48: **thub.c***Ri*e-The-Ligh*nin**RTL]^*22 49: githu*.com/Sam**r**-Wa*let/*amourai*wa*l*t-**dro*d]^^2* 50: g****b*c*m/zkSNAC*s/Wall*tWasabi]*^24 51: git*ub*c*m/ZeusLN/***s]*^25
Unknown links are censored to prevent spreading illicit content.
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

The DEFINITIVE GUIDE to the BEST BITCOIN CORE FULL NODE, LND NODE, ELECTRUM SERVER and a lot of stuff all in one, and all scripted!!! Open source and free for almost all the features!

After some year playing with full bitcoin core nodes and lightning network nodes, starting times ago with a project called raspibolt (that teach me a lot), i can tell you to have found an awesome project that is ok for the beginner and for the professional too.
I challenge all of you to find another product (commercial too) with all of these functionality and starting from 0$. It calls myNode (this is a screenshot of the app https://ibb.co/n7KDmkx).
I discovered it by chance reading a post from the main developer here on reddit, and I wanted to discover this fantastic software to all bitcoin and tiny hardware enthusiasts like the raspberry pi that want have at home a swiss army knife :) .
Think of an automated script that takes care of configuring everything without you having to do anything. Does it seem strange to you? Try this app!
If you want more informations, please check the website https://www.mynodebtc.com and the telegram official channel with more than 150 guys happy to have discover this awesome application -> https://t.me/mynode_btc
--------------------------------
best hardware to buy: (https://www.mynodebtc.com/download)
- raspberry pi 4 with 4gb of ram
- power cable
- hdd or ssd of 1tb
- hdd or ssd adapter to connect to usb3 of raspberry pi
- micro sd of at least 16 gb
--------------------------------
best bitcoin full node software
- mynode - www.mynodebtc.com
--------------------------------
some characteristic/functionality:
- open source
- free for basic stuff
- github - https://github.com/mynodebtc/mynode
- tor enabled by default for bitcoin core and lnd
- vpn
- full bitcoin node
- lightning wallet (lnd)
- simple ui / web interface (screenshot of last release: https://ibb.co/n7KDmkx)
- bitcoin explorer
- electrum server - btc light wallet server
- ride the lightning - lightning wallet
- lnd hub - lightning wallet server
- bitcoin cli
- quicksync - quickly sync bitcoin blockchain
- lnd connect - generate qr codes for connecting wallets
- ln channel backup
- lnd manage cli tool

and a lot of stuff will be added in future like..
- joinmarket
- btcpay server
- liquid sidechain (blockstream's elements)
- samourai dojo (whirlpool)
- blockstream satellite cli
--------------------------------
steps to use it (https://www.mynodebtc.com/download)
0 - collect hardware
1 - download image from site
2 - flash image
3 - boot device
4 - enjoy
--------------------------------
submitted by CAPTIVE_AMIGA to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Project: My own bank: Cold storage without proprietary hardware

Hi all,
I am playing with the thought of setting up a cold storage for bitcoin using a multisig wallet.
The objective is to have BTC under own control (not on an exchange!) but minimize risk of 'own storage' and keeping the thing manageable with intermediate knowledge. The whole thing should run without BTC proprietary hardware like trezors, it should run on 'regular hardware'.
It seems the following approach could work: - multisig electrum wallet - one wallet completely offline on airgapped device - electrum private server connected through vpn and firewalls with separate ip, different to home network
What are your thoughts on these points: - electrum a good choice regarding usability, or even the only choice if multisig wallet needed? - electrum having limited privacy without own server; setting up a new (electrum?) server as own node (which is a shame as I have a functioning bitcoin full node). Is there a way to get electrum or another desktop wallet with multisig support running with a regular full node ? - own node to verify own transactions and to avoid disclosing wallet balances to unknown servers - the offline machine will need updating at some stage if new versions of electrum are out (??) how to go about this - keeping software and setup overall robust long term (many years - where it's possible to re-install the wallet, replace its hardware)
-- syd
submitted by sydrooz to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Popular Bitcoin wallet Electrum (pre version 3.0.4) has a vulnerability where your keys can be exposed to any website that asks for it

Popular Bitcoin wallet Electrum (pre version 3.0.4) has a vulnerability where your keys can be exposed to any website that asks for it submitted by Phinaeus to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

r/Bitcoin recap - July 2019

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the 31st monthly Bitcoin news recap.
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in July 2019
Adoption
Development
Security
Mining
Business
Education
Regulation & Politics
Archeology (Financial Incumbents)
Price & Trading
Fun & Other
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bylls — the Canadian Bitcoin bill payment service by Bull Bitcoin — celebrates its 6th birthday

I sometimes find it hard to believe that it has already been 6 years since the public launch of Bylls on January 13 2014. What started out as a simple and humble “garage startup”, the world’s first Bitcoin bill payment service, evolved into so much more.
Bylls eventually became the company that people know today as Bull Bitcoin, and it is from Bylls’ UASF advocacy that sprouted the Cyphernode open-source project. I also like to think of Bylls as a “bitcoin culture” institution that served as the vanguard of the Bitcoin Maximalist and Cypherpunk movements within the Bitcoin exchange and payments industry.
Happy Birthday Bylls! 🎂

What is Bylls?

For those of you who don’t know about Bylls, here’s a short summary:

Short history of world’s first Bitcoin bill payment service

Bylls was founded in 2013 by Eric Spano, a Montreal entrepreneur part of the original Bitcoin Embassy team. Eric, one of my earliest and most influential mentors, is a true Bitcoin OG. Check out his 2014 Bitcoin Ted Talk or his 2019 Podcast on Tales From the Crypt which describes in great detail the inception of Bylls.
When Bylls was launched, I was Public Affairs Director at the Bitcoin Embassy, the world’s first physical Bitcoin hub (a 14,000 square feet building downtown Montreal). Bylls was effectively a one-man operation, with Eric doing pretty much everything himself. I wasn’t directly involved with the company, but Bylls was one of the startups in the Embassy’s incubator program, so I was helping out in various ways. My first “public appearance” in the Bitcoin industry was actually to man the Bylls booth at the Toronto Bitcoin Expo in 2014!
In 2015, Eric was offered a huge career opportunity that he couldn’t accept without stepping down from running Bylls. It was to me an inconceivable tragedy for Bitcoin to let Bylls quitely close down. For the past 2 years, whenever somebody asked me “what can you do with Bitcoin?”, I would always reply “well, for starters, you can pay all your bills in Canada, even your taxes and your credit card”. What was I going to say now?
I had just founded my company Satoshi Portal Inc. with the aim of developing a non-custodial Bitcoin exchange (which eventually became Bull Bitcoin). And so, I acquired Bylls from Eric and it immediately became the focus of all my energy. For the first year, our team consisted of only 2 people including our lead developer Arthur which is still working on Bylls features to this day. From the beginning until today, we are still 100% self-funded. We grew organically and slowly. My philosophy on entrepreneurship and startup scaling is articulated in this medium post.It has been an incredibly intense journey. I cannot think of a more challenging professional experience than being a startup founder and entrepreneur in the Bitcoin industry. The number of Bitcoin startups that have perished since is a stark reminder. Some of them sank quietly, but many went down in flames taking down their users with them. The fact that Bylls is still standing — without VC funding and with its reputation intact — is my proudest achievement.
Over the past 4 years. we completely redesigned the software, continuously adding new features, but the core of the service remained the same. Most importantly, we added the ability for users to pay any individual or business in Canada by creating a personal biller from their bank details. Previously, they were limited to Bylls’ biller list of around 9000 billers.
One of the defining moments in the history of Bylls was UASF. Bylls was one of the first Bitcoin companies to support BIP-148 for the activation of Segwit (second after Bitconic). Not only that, but we were the first to run a public BIP-148 block explorer and public UASF electrum server. We had done a “seppuku pledge” regarding BIP-148, meaning that we would only accept coins from the UASF segwit chain and would pay the Bitcoin market price for them. If UASF had failed, we would not have survived. This cemented our ideology of “skin-in-the-game”. We would never compromise on our values, no matter the cost. Our policy on forks (2017) was described here. But the jist of it is:
Satoshi Portal is a Bitcoin-only company and does not conduct any transaction in any altcoin, including altcoins that are the result of a fork of the Bitcoin blockchain and which can be spent with Bitcoin private keys. This includes, but is not limited to, the coins commonly referred to as BCash, Segwit2X, BGold, Clams and Lumens.We strongly oppose the “New York Agreement” and will under no circumstance ever recognize the Segwit2X blockchain (and BTC1 client) as Bitcoin, regardless of market response or hashing power. In the unlikely event that an overwhelming majority of the Bitcoin ecosystem migrates to the Segwit2X blockchain, Satoshi Portal will continue nevertheless to support the Bitcoin blockchain.
Following the UASF/NO2X “war” in 2017, we devoted a large prortion of ressources to building Cyphernode, an open-source project that makes it very easy for startups to build and deploy Bitcoin applies without any third-parties, using exclusively their own full nodes. We are still developing this project today and plan on actively maintaining it in the future.
It is also worth noting that Bylls has never accepted any altcoins and was one of the first company to pledge never to accept altcoins in the future, leading to what became the “Bitcoin-Only” movement. We were also the first Bitcoin exchange and payment processing company, to our knowledge, that has integrated coinjoin as part of its processes.

Unbanking yourself with Bylls

The coolest feature of Bylls is that you can pay pretty much all your expenses with Bitcoin without needing to go through a bank account. In Canada, you can obtain a credit card without having it linked to a bank account. In 2016, the last of my personal bank accounts was closed due to my activities in the Bitcoin industry. I decided not apply at another bank and try the experiment of living completely unbanked. I’m happy to report it was a success, and serves as a powerful testament for the use-cases provided by Bylls.
I really like the idea of not owning any fiat. You can pay pretty much all daily expenses with a credit card, and pay back the debt with Bitcoin. Of course you have fiat-denominated debts which conveniently tends to diminish in price over time.
You can withdraw cash from a credit card and pay it off instantly with Bylls, so you can get access to cash at any time, in any country across the world, without having a bank account. The only inconvenience is the cash advance fee.
When you have to pay larger amounts such as rent or whatever services don’t accept cash or credit card, you can find the biller in the Bylls list or ask the recipient for his banking details, the same as you would for a wire transfer.

The future of Bylls

Many people ask us if we intend to expand outside of Canada. The answer is, unequivocally, no. We will always be a Canada-only, Bitcoin-only company. That doesn’t mean that we stop working hard to improve our services. We will continue to be the first to integrate the cutting-edge Bitcoin technologies that
Here is are some of the features you can expect in 2020:
Thanks for reading! 🎂
Yours truly,
Francis
Original post here: https://medium.com/bull-bitcoin/bylls-the-canadian-bitcoin-bill-payment-service-by-bull-bitcoin-celebrates-its-6th-birthday-ef6d22acdf2a
submitted by FrancisPouliot to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

cold storage compatibility issues

Hello, I have been a fan of electrum because of its offline capability. I like that I can use Bitcoin while storing my private keys on a computer that has the wifi card removed and hot glue stuffed in the Ethernet port. However it looks like maybe the electrum developers have over-promised and under-delivered in this regard. Or, maybe they simply do not have the time, energy, resources to make this work in real life.
Let me explain. I have an old-ass computer that is running Ubuntu 12 (precise), this computer has electrum 2.5.4 installed with a cold-storage wallet that has my private key.
I want to send some bitcoin from that address to a new wallet on my desktop so I can spend the bitcoin. So I installed electrum (newest version 3.3.8) on my desktop, imported the bitcoin address, and created a transaction. Then I sent the transaction to the offline computer out of band, and verified that the out-of-band transmission worked by comparing the hash of the txn file on both the offline and online machines. Then I tried to open the txn file on the offline machine with Electrum 2.5.4. Well, guess what, it didn't work. Electrum 2.5.4 printed to the console:
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "/uslocal/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/Electrum-2.5.4-py2.7.egg/electrum_gui/qt/main_window.py", line 2261, in do_process_from_file
self.show_transaction(tx)
File "/uslocal/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/Electrum-2.5.4-py2.7.egg/electrum_gui/qt/main_window.py", line 577, in show_transaction
show_transaction(tx, self, tx_desc)
File "/uslocal/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/Electrum-2.5.4-py2.7.egg/electrum_gui/qt/transaction_dialog.py", line 37, in show_transaction
d = TxDialog(tx, parent, desc, prompt_if_unsaved)
File "/uslocal/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/Electrum-2.5.4-py2.7.egg/electrum_gui/qt/transaction_dialog.py", line 48, in __init__
self.tx.deserialize()
File "/uslocal/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/Electrum-2.5.4-py2.7.egg/electrum/transaction.py", line 523, in deserialize
d = deserialize(self.raw)
File "/uslocal/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/Electrum-2.5.4-py2.7.egg/electrum/transaction.py", line 454, in deserialize
d[inputs] = list(parse_input(vds) for i in xrange(n_vin))
OverflowError: Python int too large to convert to C long
That's pretty frustrating, the first thing I tried was to install Electrum 2.5.4 on my Desktop and try to create a new unsigned transaction with Electrum 2.5.4. However, this is a no-go because old versions of Electrum cannot connect to Electrum servers any more. So I have to try to update the Electrum on the Offline computer. But I'm not even sure if this is possible considering how ubuntu 12 it's definitely out of support at this point and the offline computer does not even have python3 installed, let alone the GTK stuff or whatever is probably required to run Electrum.
I'm starting to regret choosing a GUI-based wallet for my offline storage considering how hard it is to actually use this and how it simply melts over time... even just 5 years is is enough time to completely melt and destroy this software and make it un-usable. Time Catches All. So now I have to go out and buy a new computer that can run the updated OS, so I can install the new version of Electrum, so I can access my bitcoin.
Do you have any other ideas? Has anyone else experienced anything like this?
submitted by throwaway_23f32f to Electrum [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin 6th Anniversary Release

Introduction

Dear Groestlers, it goes without saying that 2020 has been a difficult time for millions of people worldwide. The groestlcoin team would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone our best to everyone coping with the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. Let it bring out the best in us all and show that collectively, we can conquer anything.
The centralised banks and our national governments are facing unprecedented times with interest rates worldwide dropping to record lows in places. Rest assured that this can only strengthen the fundamentals of all decentralised cryptocurrencies and the vision that was seeded with Satoshi's Bitcoin whitepaper over 10 years ago. Despite everything that has been thrown at us this year, the show must go on and the team will still progress and advance to continue the momentum that we have developed over the past 6 years.
In addition to this, we'd like to remind you all that this is Groestlcoin's 6th Birthday release! In terms of price there have been some crazy highs and lows over the years (with highs of around $2.60 and lows of $0.000077!), but in terms of value– Groestlcoin just keeps getting more valuable! In these uncertain times, one thing remains clear – Groestlcoin will keep going and keep innovating regardless. On with what has been worked on and completed over the past few months.

UPDATED - Groestlcoin Core 2.18.2

This is a major release of Groestlcoin Core with many protocol level improvements and code optimizations, featuring the technical equivalent of Bitcoin v0.18.2 but with Groestlcoin-specific patches. On a general level, most of what is new is a new 'Groestlcoin-wallet' tool which is now distributed alongside Groestlcoin Core's other executables.
NOTE: The 'Account' API has been removed from this version which was typically used in some tip bots. Please ensure you check the release notes from 2.17.2 for details on replacing this functionality.

How to Upgrade?

Windows
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer.
OSX
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), run the dmg and drag Groestlcoin Core to Applications.
Ubuntu
http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=441.0

Other Linux

http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=97.0

Download

Download the Windows Installer (64 bit) here
Download the Windows Installer (32 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (32 bit) here
Download the OSX Installer here
Download the OSX binaries here
Download the Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Linux binaries (32 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (32 bit) here

Source

ALL NEW - Groestlcoin Moonshine iOS/Android Wallet

Built with React Native, Moonshine utilizes Electrum-GRS's JSON-RPC methods to interact with the Groestlcoin network.
GRS Moonshine's intended use is as a hot wallet. Meaning, your keys are only as safe as the device you install this wallet on. As with any hot wallet, please ensure that you keep only a small, responsible amount of Groestlcoin on it at any given time.

Features

Download

iOS
Android

Source

ALL NEW! – HODL GRS Android Wallet

HODL GRS connects directly to the Groestlcoin network using SPV mode and doesn't rely on servers that can be hacked or disabled.
HODL GRS utilizes AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, and the latest security features to protect users from malware, browser security holes, and even physical theft. Private keys are stored only in the secure enclave of the user's phone, inaccessible to anyone other than the user.
Simplicity and ease-of-use is the core design principle of HODL GRS. A simple recovery phrase (which we call a Backup Recovery Key) is all that is needed to restore the user's wallet if they ever lose or replace their device. HODL GRS is deterministic, which means the user's balance and transaction history can be recovered just from the backup recovery key.

Features

Download

Main Release (Main Net)
Testnet Release

Source

ALL NEW! – GroestlcoinSeed Savior

Groestlcoin Seed Savior is a tool for recovering BIP39 seed phrases.
This tool is meant to help users with recovering a slightly incorrect Groestlcoin mnemonic phrase (AKA backup or seed). You can enter an existing BIP39 mnemonic and get derived addresses in various formats.
To find out if one of the suggested addresses is the right one, you can click on the suggested address to check the address' transaction history on a block explorer.

Features

Live Version (Not Recommended)

https://www.groestlcoin.org/recovery/

Download

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/mnemonic-recovery/archive/master.zip

Source

ALL NEW! – Vanity Search Vanity Address Generator

NOTE: NVidia GPU or any CPU only. AMD graphics cards will not work with this address generator.
VanitySearch is a command-line Segwit-capable vanity Groestlcoin address generator. Add unique flair when you tell people to send Groestlcoin. Alternatively, VanitySearch can be used to generate random addresses offline.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic addresses generated by regular groestlcoin clients, then VanitySearch is the right choice for you to create a more personalized address.
VanitySearch is a groestlcoin address prefix finder. If you want to generate safe private keys, use the -s option to enter your passphrase which will be used for generating a base key as for BIP38 standard (VanitySearch.exe -s "My PassPhrase" FXPref). You can also use VanitySearch.exe -ps "My PassPhrase" which will add a crypto secure seed to your passphrase.
VanitySearch may not compute a good grid size for your GPU, so try different values using -g option in order to get the best performances. If you want to use GPUs and CPUs together, you may have best performances by keeping one CPU core for handling GPU(s)/CPU exchanges (use -t option to set the number of CPU threads).

Features

Usage

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/VanitySearch#usage

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020

Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020 is a windows app built from the ground-up and makes it easier than ever before to create your very own bespoke bech32 address(es) when whilst not connected to the internet.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic bech32 addresses generated by regular Groestlcoin clients, then Groestlcoin EasyVanity2020 is the right choice for you to create a more personalised bech32 address. This 2020 version uses the new VanitySearch to generate not only legacy addresses (F prefix) but also Bech32 addresses (grs1 prefix).

Features

Download

Source

Remastered! – Groestlcoin WPF Desktop Wallet (v2.19.0.18)

Groestlcoin WPF is an alternative full node client with optional lightweight 'thin-client' mode based on WPF. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is one of Microsoft's latest approaches to a GUI framework, used with the .NET framework. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for exporting blockchain.dat and including a lite wallet mode.
This wallet was previously deprecated but has been brought back to life with modern standards.

Features

Remastered Improvements

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – BIP39 Key Tool

Groestlcoin BIP39 Key Tool is a GUI interface for generating Groestlcoin public and private keys. It is a standalone tool which can be used offline.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux :
 pip3 install -r requirements.txt python3 bip39\_gui.py 

Source

ALL NEW! – Electrum Personal Server

Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum Groestlcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum-GRS wallet to your own full node.
It is an implementation of the Electrum-grs server protocol which fulfils the specific need of using the Electrum-grs wallet backed by a full node, but without the heavyweight server backend, for a single user. It allows the user to benefit from all Groestlcoin Core's resource-saving features like pruning, blocks only and disabled txindex. All Electrum-GRS's feature-richness like hardware wallet integration, multi-signature wallets, offline signing, seed recovery phrases, coin control and so on can still be used, but connected only to the user's own full node.
Full node wallets are important in Groestlcoin because they are a big part of what makes the system be trust-less. No longer do people have to trust a financial institution like a bank or PayPal, they can run software on their own computers. If Groestlcoin is digital gold, then a full node wallet is your own personal goldsmith who checks for you that received payments are genuine.
Full node wallets are also important for privacy. Using Electrum-GRS under default configuration requires it to send (hashes of) all your Groestlcoin addresses to some server. That server can then easily spy on your transactions. Full node wallets like Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server would download the entire blockchain and scan it for the user's own addresses, and therefore don't reveal to anyone else which Groestlcoin addresses they are interested in.
Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can also broadcast transactions through Tor which improves privacy by resisting traffic analysis for broadcasted transactions which can link the IP address of the user to the transaction. If enabled this would happen transparently whenever the user simply clicks "Send" on a transaction in Electrum-grs wallet.
Note: Currently Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can only accept one connection at a time.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux / OSX (Instructions)

Source

UPDATED – Android Wallet 7.38.1 - Main Net + Test Net

The app allows you to send and receive Groestlcoin on your device using QR codes and URI links.
When using this app, please back up your wallet and email them to yourself! This will save your wallet in a password protected file. Then your coins can be retrieved even if you lose your phone.

Changes

Download

Main Net
Main Net (FDroid)
Test Net

Source

UPDATED – Groestlcoin Sentinel 3.5.06 (Android)

Groestlcoin Sentinel is a great solution for anyone who wants the convenience and utility of a hot wallet for receiving payments directly into their cold storage (or hardware wallets).
Sentinel accepts XPUB's, YPUB'S, ZPUB's and individual Groestlcoin address. Once added you will be able to view balances, view transactions, and (in the case of XPUB's, YPUB's and ZPUB's) deterministically generate addresses for that wallet.
Groestlcoin Sentinel is a fork of Groestlcoin Samourai Wallet with all spending and transaction building code removed.

Changes

Download

Source

UPDATED – P2Pool Test Net

Changes

Download

Pre-Hosted Testnet P2Pool is available via http://testp2pool.groestlcoin.org:21330/static/

Source

submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

/r/Bitcoin FAQ - Newcomers please read

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
The following videos are a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
For some more great introductory videos check out Andreas Antonopoulos's YouTube playlists, he is probably the best bitcoin educator out there today. Also have to give mention to James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series. Lots of additional video resources can be found at the videos wiki page or /BitcoinTV.
Key properties of bitcoin
Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found here. Bitcoin statistics can be found here, here and here. Developer resources can be found here and here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here. The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here. Scaling resources here, and of course the whitepaper that started it all.

Where can I buy bitcoins?

BuyBitcoinWorldwide.com and Howtobuybitcoin.io are helpful sites for beginners. You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank transfer. Some of the more popular resources are below, also, check out the bitcoinity exchange resources for a larger list of options for purchases.
Bank Transfer Credit / Debit card Cash
Coinbase Coinbase LocalBitcoins
Gemini Bitstamp LibertyX
GDAX Bitit Mycelium LocalTrader
Bitstamp Cex.io BitQuick
Kraken CoinMama WallofCoins
Xapo BitcoinOTC
Cex.io
itBit
Bitit
Bitsquare
Here is a listing of local ATMs. If you would like your paycheck automatically converted to bitcoin use Cashila or Bitwage.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Preev is a useful site that that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "Be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use third party companies aka "Bitcoin banks" which will hold the bitcoins for you.
Android iOs Desktop
Mycelium BreadWallet Electrum
CoPay AirBitz Armory
Another interesting use case for physical storage/transfer is the Opendime. Opendime is a small USB stick that allows you to spend Bitcoin by physically passing it along so it's anonymous and tangible like cash.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account, usually from a text message or app, making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below. Make sure you create backups of your 2FA codes.
Google Auth Authy
Android Android
iOS iOS

Where can I spend bitcoins?

A more comprehensive list can be found at the Trade FAQ but some more commons ones are below.
Store Product
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
Steam, HumbleBundle, Games Planet, itch.io, g2g and kinguin For when you need to get your game on
Microsoft Xbox games, phone apps and software
Spendabit, The Bitcoin Shop, Overstock, DuoSearch, The Bitcoin Directory and BazaarBay Retail shopping with millions of results
ShakePay Generate one time use Visa cards in seconds
NewEgg and Dell For all your electronics needs
Cashila, Bitwa.la, Coinbills, Piixpay, Bitbill.eu, Bylls, Coins.ph, Bitrefill, Pey.de, LivingRoomofSatoshi, Hyphen.to, Coinsfer, GetPaidinBitcoin, Coins.co.th, More #1, #2 Bill payment
Foodler, Menufy, Takeaway, Thuisbezorgd NL, Pizza For Coins Takeout delivered to your door!
Expedia, Cheapair, Lot, Destinia, BTCTrip, Abitsky, SkyTours, Fluege the Travel category on Gyft and 9flats For when you need to get away
BoltVM, BitHost VPS service
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Namecheap, Porkbun For new domain name registration
Stampnik and GetUSPS Discounted USPS Priority, Express, First-Class mail postage
Reddit Gold Premium membership which can be gifted to others
Coinmap, 99Bitcoins and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. A good resource for UK residents is at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations, such as Wikipedia, Red Cross, Amnesty International, United Way, ACLU and the EFF. You can find a longer list here.

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. Bitseed is an easy option for getting set up. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
Site Description
WorkingForBitcoins, Bitwage, XBTfreelancer, Cryptogrind, Bitlancerr, Coinality, Bitgigs, /Jobs4Bitcoins, Rein Project Freelancing
OpenBazaar, Purse.io, Bitify, /Bitmarket, 21 Market Marketplaces
Watchmybit, Streamium.io, OTika.tv, XOtika.tv NSFW, /GirlsGoneBitcoin NSFW Video Streaming
Bitasker, BitforTip, WillPayCoin Tasks
Supload.com, SatoshiBox, JoyStream, File Army File/Image Sharing
CoinAd, A-ads, Coinzilla.io Advertising
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker on JoinMarket by allowing users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins)

Bitcoin Projects

The following is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.
Project Description
Lightning Network, Amiko Pay, and Strawpay Payment channels for network scaling
Blockstream and Drivechain Sidechains
21, Inc. Open source library for the machine payable web
ShapeShift.io Trade between bitcoins and altcoins easily
Open Transactions, Counterparty, Omni, Open Assets, Symbiont and Chain Financial asset platforms
Hivemind and Augur Prediction markets
Mirror Smart contracts
Mediachain Decentralized media library
Tierion and Factom Records & Titles on the blockchain
BitMarkets, DropZone, Beaver and Open Bazaar Decentralized markets
Samourai and Dark Wallet - abandoned Privacy-enhancing wallets
JoinMarket CoinJoin implementation (Increase privacy and/or Earn interest on bitcoin holdings)
Coinffeine and Bitsquare Decentralized bitcoin exchanges
Keybase and Bitrated Identity & Reputation management
Bitmesh and Telehash Mesh networking
JoyStream BitTorrent client with paid seeding
MORPHiS Decentralized, encrypted internet
Storj and Sia Decentralized file storage
Streamium and Faradam Pay in real time for on-demand services
Abra Global P2P money transmitter network
bitSIM PIN secure hardware token between SIM & Phone
Identifi Decentralized address book w/ ratings system
Coinometrics Institutional-level Bitcoin Data & Research
Blocktrail and BitGo Multisig bitcoin API
Bitcore Open source Bitcoin javascript library
Insight Open source blockchain API
Leet Kill your friends and take their money ;)

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin SI unit for milli i.e. millilitre (mL) or millimetre (mm)
microbitcoin μBTC 1,000,000 per bitcoin SI unit for micro i.e microlitre (μL) or micrometre (μm)
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin Colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin Smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $500 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit. A complete list of bitcoin related subreddits can be found here
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BinaryResult to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How To Use Electrum Bitcoin Wallet Link in description Electrum Personal Server by Chris Belcher - DEMO - Understanding Bitcoin - Day 2 How to Setup a Electrum Bitcoin Wallet on Testnet  Free Bitcoin Faucet  PIAIC Server Probleme - Electrum Wallet / Update 3.3 BTCP Electrum Wallet Setup + Claiming BTCP Tutorial

Electrum - Bitcoin Wallet 4.0.2 Englisch: Mit dem kostelosen Tool Electrum erhalten Sie eine Bitcoin Wallet für den PC. Es gibt eine Tendenz, auf aus dem Internet heruntergeladene Software zu vertrauen. Bitcoin schafft jedoch neue Anreize für den Einsatz von Malware durch Downloads. Wenn Sie nicht jede Zeile des Electrum-Codes überprüfen, laufen Sie Gefahr, Malware zu installieren. Eine Möglichkeit ist, dem führenden Entwickler von Electrum, Thomas Voegtlin, zu vertrauen, der seit 2011 Electrum baut. Der ... Electrum is a lightweight Bitcoin client, based on a client-server protocol. It was released on november 5, 2011. Main features: Encrypted wallet: the file that contains bitcoin private keys is protected with a password, and never leaves the user's computer.; Deterministic key generation: If you lose your wallet file, you can recover it from its seed.You are protected from your own mistakes. Electrum Electrum ist auf Geschwindigkeit und Einfachheit fokussiert und benötigt wenig Ressourcen. Es nutzt entfernte Server, die den komplizierten Teil des Bitcoin-Systems übernehmen und ermöglicht es, mit einer geheimen Phrase wieder Zugriff auf eine Wallet zu bekommen. Electrum is a lightweight Bitcoin client, based on a client-server protocol. It was released on November 5, 2011. Main features. Encrypted wallet: the file that contains bitcoin private keys is protected with a password, and never leaves the user's computer.; Deterministic key generation: If you lose your wallet file, you can recover it from its seed.You are protected from your own mistakes.

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How To Use Electrum Bitcoin Wallet Link in description

How to use electrum bitcoin wallet How to use the electrum bitcoin cryptocurrency wallet, here this 30 min video will show you how to use the wallet and set your preferences. There is also ... Electrum Server Probleme?? Das liegt dann wahrscheinlich an deiner Wallet Version, wenn sie älter als die 3.3 ist. Mit dem neuen Update auf der Homepage von Electrum hast du das Problem nicht ... How to Install the Genuine Electrum Bitcoin Wallet (and Avoid the "Fake" One) - Duration: 27:12. Rex Kneisley 8,520 views How to Setup a Electrum Bitcoin Wallet on Testnet & Free Bitcoin Faucet PIAIC Description: Electrum Wallet Download : https://electrum.org/#download Free T... How to Setup a Bitcoin Wallet with Electrum - Duration: 8:23. Thought Provoking Tech 27,395 views. 8:23. Programming in Visual Basic .Net How to Connect Access Database to VB.Net - Duration: 19:11 ...

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